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Serious Virus....I skipped the techy ****. Here is what you need to know!

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  • Serious Virus....I skipped the techy ****. Here is what you need to know!

    Just recieved this email and thougth I would share! I didn't do a search to see if it was true. I did however follow the link to MS and they do have the program to download!
    Just a heads up!


    If you are using ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PASSWORDS, CHANGE IMMEDIATELY!
    123
    1234
    12345
    123456
    1234567
    12345678
    123456789
    1234567890
    123123
    12321
    123321
    123abc
    123qwe
    123asd
    1234abcd
    1234qwer
    1q2w3e
    a1b2c3
    admin
    Admin
    administrator
    nimda
    qwewq
    qweewq
    qwerty
    qweasd
    asdsa
    asddsa
    asdzxc
    asdfgh
    qweasdzxc
    q1w2e3
    qazwsx
    qazwsxedc
    zxcxz
    zxccxz
    zxcvb
    zxcvbn
    passwd
    password
    Password
    login
    Login
    pass
    mypass
    mypassword
    adminadmin
    root
    rootroot
    test
    testtest
    temp
    temptemp
    foofoo
    foobar
    default
    password1
    password12
    password123
    admin1
    admin12
    admin123
    pass1
    pass12
    pass123
    root123
    pw123
    abc123
    qwe123
    test123
    temp123
    mypc123
    home123
    work123
    boss123
    love123
    sample
    example
    internet
    Internet
    nopass
    nopassword
    nothing
    ihavenopass
    temporary
    manager
    business
    oracle
    lotus
    database
    backup
    owner
    computer
    server
    secret
    super
    share
    superuser
    supervisor
    office
    shadow
    system
    public
    secure
    security
    desktop
    changeme
    codename
    codeword
    nobody
    cluster
    customer
    exchange
    explorer
    campus
    money
    access
    domain
    letmein
    letitbe
    anything
    unknown
    monitor
    windows
    files
    academia
    account
    student
    freedom
    forever
    cookie
    coffee
    market
    private
    games
    killer
    controller
    intranet
    work
    home
    job
    foo
    web
    file
    sql
    aaa
    aaaa
    aaaaa
    qqq
    qqqq
    qqqqq
    xxx
    xxxx
    xxxxx
    zzz
    zzzz
    zzzzz
    ****
    12
    21
    321
    4321
    54321
    654321
    7654321
    87654321
    987654321
    0987654321
    0
    00
    000
    0000
    00000
    00000
    0000000
    00000000
    1
    11
    111
    1111
    11111
    111111
    1111111
    11111111
    2
    22
    222
    2222
    22222
    222222
    2222222
    22222222
    3
    33
    333
    3333
    33333
    333333
    3333333
    33333333
    4
    44
    444
    4444
    44444
    444444
    4444444
    44444444
    5
    55
    555
    5555
    55555
    555555
    5555555
    55555555
    6
    66
    666
    6666
    66666
    666666
    6666666
    66666666
    7
    77
    777
    7777
    77777
    777777
    7777777
    77777777
    8
    88
    888
    8888
    88888
    888888
    8888888
    88888888
    9
    99
    999
    9999
    99999
    999999
    9999999
    99999999

    Guide to cleaning and preventing Conficker

    As of Jan. 16, 2009, F-Secure estimates in its blog that the number of Conficker-infected PCs jumped from 2.4 million to 8.9 million in just four days. Unfortunately, that number has been increasing by a million infections a day.

    I don't blindly accept F-Secure's analysis, nor that of any other security-software vendor, but it has become quite apparent that an enormous number of PCs have caught this worm.

    Even though a Conficker-infected PC may not be able to access Microsoft.com and Conficker probably disabled the PC's automatic-update function, too getting rid of the worm is surprisingly easy.
     Step 1: Check your passwords. If you have an administrator account with an easily guessed password, change it. Microsoft provides a guide to strong passwords that includes a link to the company's online password checker. If somebody other than you controls your computer's admin password, make sure that person understands the gravity of this situation.
     Step 2: Make sure you've installed the patch described in MS08-067. Open Control Panel's Add or Remove Programs list to ensure that KB 958644 has been installed. Click Start (plus Run in XP), type appwiz.cpl, and press Enter. In XP, make sure Show updates at the top of the window is checked. In Vista, click View installed updates on the left to see all of your PC's patches.

    The update in question was probably installed in late October or November of last year; look for Security Update for Microsoft Windows (KB958644). If this patch isn't installed, browse to Microsoft's Download Center to retrieve and install it. If your PC is blocked from visiting this site, use a noninfected PC to download the patch to a removable medium and install the update on the wormed PC from that device.
     Step 3: Run Microsoft's Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT). The latest version of this Microsoft tool identifies and removes all of the Conficker variants I've heard about. The easiest way to get MSRT is through Windows Update, but if you can't get through to that service on the infected PC, borrow a computer and download the tool from Microsoft's site.
     Step 4: Disable AutoPlay. If Figure 2 doesn't convince you of the risk of using Windows' AutoPlay feature, nothing will. Simply stated, you don't need AutoPlay that much. Follow the advice in Scott Dunn's Top Story from the Nov. 8, 2007, issue for comprehensive instructions to disable AutoPlay.
    Those four steps will ensure that your PC isn't one of the million or nine million, or 12 million machines currently playing host to the Conficker worm and its variants.
    "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win."

  • #2
    Originally posted by Billy Barooooooo View Post

    Step 2: Make sure you've installed the patch described in MS08-067. Open Control Panel's Add or Remove Programs list to ensure that KB 958644 has been installed. Click Start (plus Run in XP), type appwiz.cpl, and press Enter. In XP, make sure Show updates at the top of the window is checked. In Vista, click View installed updates on the left to see all of your PC's patches.
    The update in question was probably installed in late October or November of last year; look for Security Update for Microsoft Windows (KB958644). If this patch isn't installed, browse to Microsoft's Download Center to retrieve and install it. If your PC is blocked from visiting this site, use a noninfected PC to download the patch to a removable medium and install the update on the wormed PC from that device.

    Step 3: Run Microsoft's Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT). The latest version of this Microsoft tool identifies and removes all of the Conficker variants I've heard about. The easiest way to get MSRT is through Windows Update, but if you can't get through to that service on the infected PC, borrow a computer and download the tool from Microsoft's site.

    Step 4: Disable AutoPlay. If Figure 2 doesn't convince you of the risk of using Windows' AutoPlay feature, nothing will. Simply stated, you don't need AutoPlay that much. Follow the advice in Scott Dunn's Top Story from the Nov. 8, 2007, issue for comprehensive instructions to disable AutoPlay.
    Those four steps will ensure that your PC isn't one of the million or nine million, or 12 million machines currently playing host to the Conficker worm and its variants.
    :thumbs:

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